Teledyne Leeman Labs Blog

Thunderstorms and Mercury

Posted by Betsey Seibel on Oct 24, 2016 3:31:07 PM

The familiar Florida summertime clap of daily thunder signals to the kids playing ball outside that it is time to go inside for a bit.  Any U.S. Gulf Coast kid knows when the thunderstorm clouds roll overhead to get to shelter—fast--- because next to come are the threatening lightning strikes. While the lightning is a dangerous concern, the invisible pollution dangers from thunderstorms may be even worse than the lightning strikes. 

The Mercury Deposition Network has evaluated rainwater nationwide for twenty years.  It has puzzled analysts as to why the mercury levels were persistently so much higher in the southeast, especially in the Gulf Coast states of Florida and Louisiana, than those of northern states.  

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Tags: mercury

Mercury Pollution and Resource Management in Western North America

Posted by Betsey Seibel on Oct 4, 2016 3:45:15 PM

Spearheading a global group of scientists, the U.S. Geological Survey chronicled the mercury pollutants in the air, soil, sediment, plants, fish and wildlife throughout western North America.  Ecologists complied decades of data and studies to assess groupings of mercury and methylmercury.

Mercury, a heavy metal, is organically found in the rock of the earth’s crust.  It can become problematic when people, fish, and wildlife are subjected to elevated levels of mercury in its harmful configuration, methylmercury. 

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Tags: mercury, Methylmercury

Food Sleuths Seek Out Bogus Ingredients, Bad Pathogens and Imposter Foods

Posted by Betsey Seibel on Oct 3, 2016 1:01:27 PM

With millions of consumers reportedly getting sick each year from foodborne diseases, how do food analysts know the best methods to keep products safe, manage risk and protect the integrity of their brands?  With the variety of methods available in the battle of food defense, food safety experts have to carefully hone their choices. A recent article in Lab Manager magazine went into more detail about a few of these methods.

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Tags: ICP-OES

Could Remediated Ammo Manufacturing Site in Ohio be New Home to Luxury Apartments?

Posted by Betsey Seibel on Sep 27, 2016 2:43:48 PM

An abandoned ammo factory in Kings Mill, Ohio is on the EPA list as one of the most contaminated sites in the country. The site, once home to the Peter’s Cartridge Company, could be the new home to luxury apartments and commercial office space overseeing the Little Miami River. The $25 million plan, which includes 120-130 apartments and 23,000 square feet of commercial space, is dependent on whether the site can be remediated from the mercury, copper and lead that has contaminated the soil for more than a century.

 

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Tags: Hg analysis

Heavy Metals in Reagent Chemicals

Posted by Betsey Seibel on Aug 30, 2016 2:27:59 PM

When it comes to analytical testing, there is a single organization that sets the requirements and develops the methods for determining the purity of reagent chemicals, the American Chemical Society (ACS).

 

Teledyne Leeman Labs recently completed an analysis of reagent chemicals to determine their ultratrace elemental levels. The purpose of the analysis was to “demonstrate the ability of the Teledyne Leeman Lab’s Prodigy7 simultaneous ICP-OES, to quickly and accurately determine ultratrace elemental levels in selected reagent grade chemicals.” The company performed the analysis using procedures developed by the ACS. Results were then compared with ACS specifications.

 

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Tags: ICP-OES

Analyzing Beverages for Mineral and Heavy Metal Conten

Posted by Betsey Seibel on Aug 5, 2016 3:23:11 PM

Teledyne Leeman Labs recently used its Prodigy7 ICP-OES to analyze beverages for mineral and heavy metal content. The goal of the analysis was to demonstrate the effectiveness of the system and method in measuring mineral and heavy metal content in a variety of beverage samples. The results of the analysis were compared with the drinking water standards established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the World Health Organization.

 

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Tags: mercury analysis

Peru’s Mercury Emergency

Posted by Betsey Seibel on Jul 26, 2016 11:58:18 AM

Illegal gold mining operations in Peru have forced the Peruvian government to declare a state of emergency for the next two month. While the gold is valuable, the extracted process from surrounding areas has created a major health problem for local residents.

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Tags: mercury

Introducing the Prodigy Plus Inductively Coupled Plasma – Optical Emission Spectrometer

Posted by Betsey Seibel on Jul 20, 2016 3:05:55 PM

Leeman Labs is a pioneer in the ICP spectrometry industry, and we were the first to use an Echelle spectrometer for ICP-OES. Recently we added our new Prodigy Plus High Dispersion ICP Spectrometer to our family of ICP-OES instruments. The Prodigy Plus builds upon our legacy and experience, while incorporating new state-of-the-art technology.

 

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Tags: ICP-OES

Department of Energy Wants New Research and Technology to Fight Mercury Contamination

Posted by Betsey Seibel on Jul 6, 2016 4:40:23 PM

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has released a new plan to address the Environmental Management (EM) challenge of mercury contamination at two sites in Tennessee and South Carolina. The plan “advocates for research and the development of technologies that could resolve key technical uncertainties with mercury in environmental remediation, the deactivation and decommissioning of facilities, and processing waste in tanks.”

 

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Tags: mercury analysis

Citrus Peels and Waste Sulfur Key to New Mercury Absorbing Polymer

Posted by Betsey Seibel on May 17, 2016 10:30:00 AM

Citrus_fruit.jpgA research team at Flinders University in Australia has “developed an inexpensive, non-toxic polymer that can absorb hazardous mercury compounds out of water and soil.” The secret ingredient of the polymer is a colorless liquid hydrocarbon that is extracted from the peel of citrus fruits such as lemons, limes and oranges. The process to extract limonene, which gives citrus fruits their smell, includes centrifugal separation and steam distillation.

 

According to a paper published in the journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition, limonene is combined with an equal mass of molten sulfur and synthesized to form a sulfur-limonene polysulfide compound. The two-phase mixture becomes a single, dark red phase upon reaction. The mixture turns a bright yellow in the presence of mercury.

 

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Tags: mercury analysis