Teledyne Leeman Labs Blog

The Benefits of Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence (CVAF) Spectroscopy for Mercury Determination

Posted by Sara Kennedy on Sep 14, 2022 2:50:00 PM

Cold Vapor Atomic Florescence Spectroscopy (CVAF)


In contrast to most cold vapor atomic absorption (CVAA) systems, the desirable characteristics of CVAFS-based mercury analyzers include:

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Tags: CVAA, CVAF

Why Testing Mercury in Wastewater and Drinking Water Is Important

Posted by Sara Kennedy on Aug 23, 2022 5:54:21 PM

Factsheet and Understanding the Importance of Testing Mercury in Wastewater

What is Wastewater and Why Treat it?

Wastewater is made of all ‘used’ water. Its composition ranges widely from grey water produced in homes and businesses to runoff into storm drains. It also includes sewage sludge and industrial process waste. Wastewater contains any number of substances including chemicals, soaps, food scraps, oils, and human waste. Read More

Tags: Mercury in Wastewater

Who are the employees of Teledyne Tekmar/ Teledyne Leeman Labs - Aaron Keller

Posted by Teledyne Leeman Labs on Aug 10, 2022 8:20:21 AM

With today’s blog, let’s get to know the employees of Teledyne Tekmar/Leeman Labs. The next person I would like to introduce you to is Aaron Keller.

Aaron is the Leeman Labs Quality Control Chemist for the Mercury product line. He will be approaching his first full year of working Teledyne here soon.

Let's learn more about Aaron.

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Tags: Teledyne Leeman Labs, Teledyne Tekmar

Who are the employees of Teledyne Tekmar/ Teledyne Leeman Labs - Sara Kennedy

Posted by Teledyne Leeman Labs on Aug 1, 2022 4:47:09 PM

With today’s blog, let’s get to know the employees of Teledyne Tekmar/Leeman Labs. The next person I would like to introduce you to is Sara Kennedy.

Sara is the Applications Chemist for Teledyne Leeman Labs. She is an expert in mercury analysis using the Quicktrace® and Hydra II product lines. She is responsible for the overlap between marketing and chemistry. Sara helps develop analytical methods for testing customer samples, provides technical input during sales calls, and provides guidance about all thing’s mercury analysis. Sara has been with Teledyne Leeman Labs for 3 years. She was previously the Quality Control Chemist for the Teledyne Leeman Labs product lines. She is also responsible for the Hydra II C catalyst production.

Let’s ask Sara some questions to get to know her better.

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Tags: Teledyne Leeman Labs, Teledyne Tekmar

ICP Sample Preparation - An Overview - Part 2

Posted by Manny Almeida on Jul 12, 2022 3:32:26 PM

In this edition of the blog, we will continue to examine various methods of sample preparation.

Dry Ashing

Samples containing a high percentage of organic matter (biologicals and foodstuffs, for example) can be prepared by a procedure known as "dry ashing" With this technique, an amount of sample is heated in a crucible over a flame or in a muffle furnace. The use of a muffle furnace is preferred as it permits greater control of the temperature. The sample residue is then dissolved, and the analysis is performed.

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Tags: ICP-OES, Inductively Coupled Plasma

Mercury Testing in Water and Health Effects of Mercury in Drinking Water

Posted by Sara Kennedy on Jul 8, 2022 4:04:51 PM

Mercury Testing in Water and Health Effects of Mercury in Drinking Water

How does mercury get into drinking water supplies? How do we know when our drinking water is polluted? How does mercury contamination impact human health? In this blog we will focus on the sources of mercury in the environment, discuss health risks associated with mercury exposure, examine water treatment for mercury, review existing regulation designed to monitor and mitigate mercury and highlight Teledyne Leeman Labs’ role in manufacturing analyzers that test for mercury in water samples.

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Tags: mercury

ICP Heavy Metal Analysis

Posted by Manny Almeida on Jul 6, 2022 6:57:56 PM

What Is ICP Heavy Metal Analysis?

Heavy metals, including arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), lead (PB) and mercury (Hg) occur naturally in nature, and in low concentrations pose little health risk. When concentrations increase however, their presence can be toxic to plants, animals and humans. Because they are systemic toxins, routine testing is used to determine their presence and concentration. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), classifies these metals as either “known” or “probable” human carcinogens.1

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Tags: ICP-OES, Heavy Metal Analysis

Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) Overview and Components - Part 2 of 2

Posted by Manny Almeida on Jun 27, 2022 8:58:00 AM

This is part 2 of the Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry series.  Part 1 described what ICP-OES is and how it works.  Part 2 will be an overview and cover some of the components.

Overview

Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES) is a multi-element, trace-analysis technique used to measure the concentration of various elements in a variety of sample matrices. Also known as Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES), the technique is capable of measuring the majority of the elements in the Periodic Table and is currently one of the most widely used methods for elemental analysis today.

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Tags: ICP-OES, Inductively Coupled Plasma

Sample Preparation for ICP-OES - An Overview - Part 1

Posted by Manny Almeida on Jun 8, 2022 4:10:29 PM

A majority of samples analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES) are introduced to the instrument as solutions. Sample preparation for analysis by ICP-OES may be as simple as filtering and adding acid to a liquid sample or be a lengthy, complex procedure to dissolve a solid. In order to obtain the best possible analytical results, an appropriate technique must be used to convert the sample into a usable solution. Part 1 and 2 of this blog will briefly examine some of the more commonly used sample preparation techniques, and highlight their respective advantages and disadvantages.

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Tags: ICP-OES, Inductively Coupled Plasma

How Valid Is Your Data? - Part 2

Posted by Jeff Forsberg on Jun 7, 2022 9:01:34 AM

In my last blog (“How Valid Is Your Data? - Part 1”) we discussed what happens when samples enter the laboratory. We covered spiking of samples, control blanks and relative percent difference in sample concentrations. That discussion led me to close Part 1 with a “reality check” example from my own experience analyzing beverages. While everything looked great from the outside looking in… a hidden issue needed to be resolved: spectra did not match the control blanks and/or calibration. This indicated the existence of a kinetics issue in the online reduction reaction used to achieve elemental Hg – specifically, method timing constraints.

In Part 2 of this blog, I am happy to report that I’ve successfully analyzed brewed coffee, red wine, milk, orange juice, brewed tea and soda pop. The original method guidance I was using was written for ICP, via microwave digestion. Sometimes H2O2 is used to enhance oxidation in microwave digestion and the method did in fact use H2O2. Knowing that dissolved oxygen would interfere with the reduction used in the CVAA technique, I assumed that the digestion process would entirely consume the H2O2. Well it didn’t, hence my spectra issues which affected the results!

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